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Khuddaka Nikāya - The Minor Texts

Sutta Nipata

Sutta Nipata Chapter 3: The Great Chapter

3:12 Contemplating Pairs

3:12 Contemplating Pairs

So I have heard:

At one time the Buddha was staying near Sāvatthī in the Eastern Monastery, the stilt longhouse of Migāra’s mother. Now, at that time it was the sabbath—the full moon on the fifteenth day—and the Buddha was sitting in the open surrounded by the Saṅgha of monks. Then the Buddha looked around the Saṅgha of monks, who were so very silent. He addressed them:

“Suppose, mendicants, they questioned you thus: ‘There are skillful teachings that are noble, emancipating, and lead to awakening. What is the real reason for listening to such teachings?’ You should answer: ‘Only so as to truly know the pairs of teachings.’


And what pairs do they speak of?

‘This is suffering; this is the origin of suffering’: this is the first contemplation. ‘This is the cessation of suffering; this is the practice that leads to the cessation of suffering’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates rightly contemplating a pair of teachings in this way—diligent, keen, and resolute—they can expect one of two results: enlightenment in the present life, or if there’s something left over, non-return.”

That is what the Buddha said. Then the Holy One, the Teacher, went on to say:


730 “There are those who don’t understand suffering
and suffering’s cause,
and where all suffering
ceases with nothing left over.
And they don’t know the path
that leads to the stilling of suffering.

731 They lack the heart’s release,
as well as the release by wisdom.
Unable to make an end,
they continue to be reborn and grow old.

732 But there are those who understand suffering
and suffering’s cause,
and where all suffering
ceases with nothing left over.
And they understand the path
that leads to the stilling of suffering.

733 They’re endowed with the heart’s release,
as well as the release by wisdom.
Able to make an end,
they don’t continue to be reborn and grow old.”


“Suppose, mendicants, they questioned you thus: ‘Could there be another way to contemplate the pairs?’ You should say, ‘There could.’ And how could there be?

‘All the suffering that originates is caused by attachment’: this is one contemplation. ‘With the utter cessation of attachment there is no origination of suffering’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.” Then the Teacher went on to say:

“‘Whatever suffering arises, all is caused by attachments’, this is one observation. ‘With the complete ending of all attachments there is no arising of suffering’, this is a second observation. Rightly observing this duality, a monk who meditates diligent, ardent, and resolute may expect one of two results: final knowledge in this very life, or is there is anything left over, non-return."

This is what the Buddha said. Having said this, the Teacher, the Sublime One, said further:


734 “Attachment is the source of suffering
in all its countless forms in the world.
When an ignorant person builds up attachments,
that idiot returns to suffering again and again.
So let one who understands not build up attachments,
contemplating the origin of suffering and rebirth.”


“Suppose, mendicants, they questioned you thus: ‘Could there be another way to contemplate the pairs?’ You should say, ‘There could.’ And how could there be?

‘All the suffering that originates is caused by ignorance’: this is one contemplation. ‘With the utter cessation of ignorance there is no origination of suffering’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


735 “Those who journey again and again,
transmigrating through birth and death;
they go from this state to another,
destined only for ignorance.

736 For ignorance is the great delusion
because of which we have long transmigrated.
Those beings who have arrived at knowledge
do not proceed to a future life.”


“‘Could there be another way?’ … And how could there be?

‘All the suffering that originates is caused by choices’: this is one contemplation. ‘With the utter cessation of choices there is no origination of suffering’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


737 “All the suffering that originates
is caused by choices.
With the cessation of choices,
there is no origination of suffering.

738 Knowing this danger,
that suffering is caused by choices;
through the stilling of all choices,
and the stopping of perceptions,
this is the way suffering ends.
For those who truly know this,

739 rightly seeing, knowledge masters,
the astute, understanding rightly,
having overcome Māra’s bonds,
do not proceed to a future life.”


“‘Could there be another way?’ … And how could there be?

‘All the suffering that originates is caused by consciousness’: this is one contemplation. ‘With the utter cessation of consciousness there is no origination of suffering’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


740 “All the suffering that originates
is caused by consciousness.
With the cessation of consciousness,
there is no origination of suffering.

741 Knowing this danger,
that suffering is caused by consciousness,
with the stilling of consciousness a mendicant
is hungerless, extinguished.”


“‘Could there be another way?’ … And how could there be?

‘All the suffering that originates is caused by contact’: this is one contemplation. ‘With the utter cessation of contact there is no origination of suffering’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


742 “Those mired in contact,
swept down the stream of rebirths,
practicing the wrong way,
are far from the ending of fetters.

743 But those who completely understand contact,
who, understanding, delight in peace;
by comprehending contact
they are hungerless, extinguished.”


“‘Could there be another way?’ … And how could there be?

‘All the suffering that originates is caused by feeling’: this is one contemplation. ‘With the utter cessation of feeling there is no origination of suffering’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


744 “Having known everything that is felt—
whether pleasure or pain,
as well as what’s neutral,
both internally and externally—

745as suffering,
deceptive, falling apart;
they see it vanish with every touch:
that’s how they understand it.
With the ending of feelings, a mendicant
is hungerless, extinguished.”


“‘Could there be another way?’ … And how could there be?

‘All the suffering that originates is caused by craving’: this is one contemplation. ‘With the utter cessation of craving there is no origination of suffering’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


746 “Craving is a person’s partner
as they transmigrate on this long journey.
They go from this state to another,
but don’t escape transmigration.

747 Knowing this danger,
that craving is the cause of suffering—
rid of craving, free of grasping,
a mendicant would wander mindful.”


“‘Could there be another way?’ … And how could there be?

‘All the suffering that originates is caused by grasping’: this is one contemplation. ‘With the utter cessation of grasping there is no origination of suffering’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


748 “Grasping is the cause of continued existence;
one who exists falls into suffering.
Death comes to those who are born—
this is the origination of suffering.

749 That’s why with the end of grasping,
the astute, understanding rightly,
having directly known the end of rebirth,
do not proceed to a future life.”


“‘Could there be another way?’ … And how could there be?

‘All the suffering that originates is caused by instigating karma’: this is one contemplation. ‘With the utter cessation of instigation there is no origination of suffering’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


750 “All the suffering that originates
is caused by instigating karma.
With the cessation of instigation,
there is no origination of suffering.

751 Knowing this danger,
that suffering is caused by instigating karma,
having given up all instigation,
one is freed with respects to instigation.

752 For the mendicant with peaceful mind,
who has cut off craving for continued existence,
transmigration through births is finished;
there are no future lives for them.”


“‘Could there be another way?’ … And how could there be?

‘All the suffering that originates is caused by sustenance’: this is one contemplation. ‘With the utter cessation of sustenance there is no origination of suffering’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


453 “All the suffering that originates
is caused by sustenance.
With the cessation of sustenance,
there is no origination of suffering.

754 Knowing this danger,
that suffering is caused by sustenance,
completely understanding all sustenance,
one is independent of all sustenance.

755Having rightly understood the state of health,
through the ending of defilements,
using after reflection, firm in principle,
a knowledge master cannot be reckoned.”


“‘Could there be another way?’ … And how could there be?

‘All the suffering that originates is caused by perturbation’: this is one contemplation. ‘With the utter cessation of perturbation there is no origination of suffering’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


756 “All the suffering that originates
is caused by perturbation.
With the cessation of perturbation,
there is no origination of suffering.

757 Knowing this danger,
that suffering is caused by perturbation,
that’s why, having relinquished perturbation,
and stopped making karmic choices,
imperturbable, free of grasping,
a mendicant would wander mindful.”


“‘Could there be another way?’ … And how could there be?

‘For the dependent there is agitation’: this is the first contemplation. ‘For the independent there’s no agitation’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


758 “For the independent there’s no agitation.
The dependent, grasping,
goes from this state to another,
without escaping transmigration.

759 Knowing this danger,
the great fear in dependencies,
independent, free of grasping,
a mendicant would wander mindful.”


“‘Could there be another way?’ … And how could there be?

‘Formless states are more peaceful than states of form’: this is the first contemplation. ‘Cessation is more peaceful than formless states’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


760 “There are beings in the realm of luminous form,
and others stuck in the formless.
Not understanding cessation,
they return in future lives.

761 But the people who completely understand form,
not stuck in the formless,
released in cessation—
they are conquerors of death.”


“‘Could there be another way?’ … And how could there be?

‘What this world—with its gods, Māras, and Brahmās, this population with its ascetics and brahmins, its gods and humans—focuses on as true, the noble ones have clearly seen with right wisdom to be actually false’: this is the first contemplation. ‘What this world focuses on as false, the noble ones have clearly seen with right wisdom to be actually true’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates in this way they can expect enlightenment or non-return.”

Then the Teacher went on to say:


762 “See how the world with its gods
imagines not-self to be self;
habituated to name and form,
imagining this is truth.

763 For whatever you imagine it is,
it turns out to be something else.
And that is what is false in it,
for the ephemeral is deceptive by nature.

764 Extinguishment has an undeceptive nature,
the noble ones know it as truth.
Having comprehended the truth,
they are hungerless, extinguished.”


“Suppose, mendicants, they questioned you thus: ‘Could there be another way to contemplate the pairs?’ You should say, ‘There could.’ And how could there be?

‘What this world—with its gods, Māras, and Brahmās, this population with its ascetics and brahmins, its gods and humans—focuses on as happiness, the noble ones have clearly seen with right wisdom to be actually suffering’: this is the first contemplation. ‘What this world focuses on as suffering, the noble ones have clearly seen with right wisdom to be actually happiness’: this is the second contemplation. When a mendicant meditates rightly contemplating a pair of teachings in this way—diligent, keen, and resolute—they can expect one of two results: enlightenment in the present life, or if there’s something left over, non-return.

That is what the Buddha said. Then the Holy One, the Teacher, went on to say:


765 “Sights, sounds, tastes, smells,
touches, and thoughts, the lot of them—
they’re likable, desirable, and pleasurable
as long as you can say that they exist.

766 For all the world with its gods,
this is what they agree is happiness.
And where they cease
is agreed on as suffering for them.

767 The noble ones have seen as happiness
the ceasing of identity.
This insight by those who see
contradicts the whole world.

768 What others say is happiness
the noble ones say is suffering.
What others say is suffering
the noble ones know as happiness.

769 See, this teaching is hard to understand,
it confuses the ignorant.
There is darkness for the shrouded;
blackness for those who don’t see.

770 But the good are open;
like light for those who see.
Though close, they do not understand,
those fools inexpert in the teaching.

771 They’re mired in desire to be reborn,
flowing along the stream of lives,
mired in Māra’s sway:
this teaching isn’t easy for them to understand.

772 Who, apart from the noble ones,
is qualified to understand this state?
Having rightly understood this state,
the undefiled become fully extinguished.”


That is what the Buddha said. Satisfied, the mendicants were happy with what the Buddha said. And while this discourse was being spoken, the minds of sixty mendicants were freed from defilements by not grasping.

Dvayatānupassanāsutta

Evaṁ me sutaṁ:

Ekaṁ samayaṁ bhagavā sāvatthiyaṁ viharati pubbārāme migāramātupāsāde. Tena kho pana samayena bhagavā tadahuposathe pannarase puṇṇāya puṇṇamāya rattiyā bhikkhusaṅghaparivuto abbhokāse nisinno hoti. Atha kho bhagavā tuṇhībhūtaṁ tuṇhībhūtaṁ bhikkhusaṅghaṁ anuviloketvā bhikkhū āmantesi: 

"‘Ye te, bhikkhave, kusalā dhammā ariyā niyyānikā sambodhagāmino, tesaṁ vo, bhikkhave, kusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ ariyānaṁ niyyānikānaṁ sambodhagāmīnaṁ kā upanisā savanāyā’ti, iti ce, bhikkhave, pucchitāro assu, te evamassu vacanīyā:  ‘yāvadeva dvayatānaṁ dhammānaṁ yathābhūtaṁ ñāṇāyā’ti.


Kiñca dvayataṁ vadetha?

Idaṁ dukkhaṁ, ayaṁ dukkhasamudayoti ayamekānupassanā. Ayaṁ dukkhanirodho, ayaṁ dukkhanirodhagāminī paṭipadāti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā. Evaṁ sammā dvayatānupassino kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhuno appamattassa ātāpino pahitattassa viharato dvinnaṁ phalānaṁ aññataraṁ phalaṁ pāṭikaṅkhaṁ – diṭṭheva dhamme aññā, sati vā upādisese anāgāmitā"ti.

Idamavoca bhagavā. Idaṁ vatvāna sugato athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


730"Ye dukkhaṁ nappajānanti,
atho dukkhassa sambhavaṁ;
Yattha ca sabbaso dukkhaṁ,
asesaṁ uparujjhati;
Tañca maggaṁ na jānanti,
dukkhūpasamagāminaṁ.

731 Cetovimuttihīnā te,
Atho paññāvimuttiyā;
Abhabbā te antakiriyāya,
Te ve jātijarūpagā.

732 Ye ca dukkhaṁ pajānanti,
atho dukkhassa sambhavaṁ;
Yattha ca sabbaso dukkhaṁ,
asesaṁ uparujjhati;
Tañca maggaṁ pajānanti,
dukkhūpasamagāminaṁ.

733 Cetovimuttisampannā,
Atho paññāvimuttiyā;
Bhabbā te antakiriyāya,
Na te jātijarūpagāti.


‘Siyā aññenapi pariyāyena sammā dvayatānupassanā’ti, iti ce, bhikkhave, pucchitāro assu; ‘siyā’tissu vacanīyā. Kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti sabbaṁ upadhipaccayāti, ayamekānupassanā. Upadhīnaṁ tveva asesavirāganirodhā natthi dukkhassa sambhavoti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


734 "Upadhinidānā pabhavanti dukkhā,
Ye keci lokasmimanekarūpā;
Yo ve avidvā upadhiṁ karoti,
Punappunaṁ dukkhamupeti mando;
Tasmā pajānaṁ upadhiṁ na kayirā,
Dukkhassa jātippabhavānupassīti.


‘Siyā aññenapi pariyāyena sammā dvayatānupassanā’ti, iti ce, bhikkhave, pucchitāro assu; ‘siyā’tissu vacanīyā. Kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti sabbaṁ avijjāpaccayāti, ayamekānupassanā. Avijjāya tveva asesavirāganirodhā natthi dukkhassa sambhavoti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


735 "Jātimaraṇasaṁsāraṁ,
ye vajanti punappunaṁ;
Itthabhāvaññathābhāvaṁ,
avijjāyeva sā gati.

736 Avijjā hāyaṁ mahāmoho,
Yenidaṁ saṁsitaṁ ciraṁ;
Vijjāgatā ca ye sattā,
Na te gacchanti punabbhavanti.


‘Siyā aññenapi … pe … kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti sabbaṁ saṅkhārapaccayāti, ayamekānupassanā. Sankhārānaṁ tveva asesavirāganirodhā natthi dukkhassa sambhavoti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


737 "Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti,
sabbaṁ saṅkhārapaccayā;
Sankhārānaṁ nirodhena,
natthi dukkhassa sambhavo.

738 Etamādīnavaṁ ñatvā,
dukkhaṁ saṅkhārapaccayā;
Sabbasaṅkhārasamathā,
saññānaṁ uparodhanā;
Evaṁ dukkhakkhayo hoti,
etaṁ ñatvā yathātathaṁ.

739 Sammaddasā vedaguno,
Sammadaññāya paṇḍitā;
Abhibhuyya mārasaṁyogaṁ,
Na gacchanti punabbhavanti.


‘Siyā aññenapi … pe … kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti sabbaṁ viññāṇapaccayāti, ayamekānupassanā. Viññāṇassa tveva asesavirāganirodhā natthi dukkhassa sambhavoti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


740 "Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti,
Sabbaṁ viññāṇapaccayā;
Viññāṇassa nirodhena,
Natthi dukkhassa sambhavo.

741 Etamādīnavaṁ ñatvā,
Dukkhaṁ viññāṇapaccayā;
Viññāṇūpasamā bhikkhu,
Nicchāto parinibbutoti.


‘Siyā aññenapi … pe … kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti sabbaṁ phassapaccayāti, ayamekānupassanā. Phassassa tveva asesavirāganirodhā natthi dukkhassa sambhavoti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


742 "Tesaṁ phassaparetānaṁ,
Bhavasotānusārinaṁ;
Kummaggapaṭipannānaṁ,
Ārā saṁyojanakkhayo.

743 Ye ca phassaṁ pariññāya,
Aññāyupasame ratā;
Te ve phassābhisamayā,
Nicchātā parinibbutāti.


‘Siyā aññenapi … pe … kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti sabbaṁ vedanāpaccayāti, ayamekānupassanā. Vedanānaṁ tveva asesavirāganirodhā natthi dukkhassa sambhavoti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


744 "Sukhaṁ vā yadi vā dukkhaṁ,
Adukkhamasukhaṁ saha;
Ajjhattañca bahiddhā ca,
Yaṁ kiñci atthi veditaṁ.

745 Etaṁ dukkhanti ñatvāna,
Mosadhammaṁ palokinaṁ;
Phussa phussa vayaṁ passaṁ,
Evaṁ tattha vijānati;
Vedanānaṁ khayā bhikkhu,
Nicchāto parinibbutoti.


‘Siyā aññenapi … pe … kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti sabbaṁ taṇhāpaccayāti, ayamekānupassanā. Taṇhāya tveva asesavirāganirodhā natthi dukkhassa sambhavoti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


746 "Taṇhādutiyo puriso,
Dīghamaddhāna saṁsaraṁ;
Itthabhāvaññathābhāvaṁ,
Saṁsāraṁ nātivattati.

747 Etamādīnavaṁ ñatvā,
Taṇhaṁ dukkhassa sambhavaṁ;
Vītataṇho anādāno,
Sato bhikkhu paribbajeti.


‘Siyā aññenapi … pe … kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti sabbaṁ upādānapaccayāti, ayamekānupassanā. Upādānānaṁ tveva asesavirāganirodhā natthi dukkhassa sambhavoti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


748 "Upādānapaccayā bhavo,
Bhūto dukkhaṁ nigacchati;
Jātassa maraṇaṁ hoti,
Eso dukkhassa sambhavo.

749 Tasmā upādānakkhayā,
Sammadaññāya paṇḍitā;
Jātikkhayaṁ abhiññāya,
Na gacchanti punabbhavanti.


‘Siyā aññenapi … pe … kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti sabbaṁ ārambhapaccayāti, ayamekānupassanā. Ārambhānaṁ tveva asesavirāganirodhā natthi dukkhassa sambhavoti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


750 "Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti,
Sabbaṁ ārambhapaccayā;
Ārambhānaṁ nirodhena,
Natthi dukkhassa sambhavo.

751 Etamādīnavaṁ ñatvā,
Dukkhaṁ ārambhapaccayā;
Sabbārambhaṁ paṭinissajja,
Anārambhe vimuttino.

752 Ucchinnabhavataṇhassa,
Santacittassa bhikkhuno;
Vikkhīṇo jātisaṁsāro,
Natthi tassa punabbhavoti.


‘Siyā aññenapi … pe … kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti sabbaṁ āhārapaccayāti, ayamekānupassanā. Āhārānaṁ tveva asesavirāganirodhā natthi dukkhassa sambhavoti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


753 "Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti,
Sabbaṁ āhārapaccayā;
Āhārānaṁ nirodhena,
Natthi dukkhassa sambhavo.

754 Etamādīnavaṁ ñatvā,
Dukkhaṁ āhārapaccayā;
Sabbāhāraṁ pariññāya,
Sabbāhāramanissito.

755 Ārogyaṁ sammadaññāya,
Āsavānaṁ parikkhayā;
Sankhāya sevī dhammaṭṭho,
Sankhyaṁ nopeti vedagūti.


‘Siyā aññenapi … pe … kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti sabbaṁ iñjitapaccayāti, ayamekānupassanā. Iñjitānaṁ tveva asesavirāganirodhā natthi dukkhassa sambhavoti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


756 "Yaṁ kiñci dukkhaṁ sambhoti,
Sabbaṁ iñjitapaccayā;
Iñjitānaṁ nirodhena,
Natthi dukkhassa sambhavo.

757 Etamādīnavaṁ ñatvā,
Dukkhaṁ iñjitapaccayā;
Tasmā hi ejaṁ vossajja,
Sankhāre uparundhiya;
Anejo anupādāno,
Sato bhikkhu paribbajeti.


‘Siyā aññenapi … pe … kathañca siyā?

Nissitassa calitaṁ hotīti, ayamekānupassanā. Anissito na calatīti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


758 "Anissito na calati,
Nissito ca upādiyaṁ;
Itthabhāvaññathābhāvaṁ,
Saṁsāraṁ nātivattati.

759 Etamādīnavaṁ ñatvā,
Nissayesu mahabbhayaṁ;
Anissito anupādāno,
Sato bhikkhu paribbajeti.


‘Siyā aññenapi … pe … kathañca siyā?

Rūpehi, bhikkhave, arūpā santatarāti, ayamekānupassanā. Arūpehi nirodho santataroti, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


760 "Ye ca rūpūpagā sattā,
Ye ca arūpaṭṭhāyino;
Nirodhaṁ appajānantā,
Āgantāro punabbhavaṁ.

761 Ye ca rūpe pariññāya,
Arūpesu asaṇṭhitā;
Nirodhe ye vimuccanti,
Te janā maccuhāyinoti.


‘Siyā aññenapi … pe … kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ, bhikkhave, sadevakassa lokassa samārakassa sabrahmakassa sassamaṇabrāhmaṇiyā pajāya sadevamanussāya idaṁ saccanti upanijjhāyitaṁ tadamariyānaṁ etaṁ musāti yathābhūtaṁ sammappaññāya sudiṭṭhaṁ, ayamekānupassanā. Yaṁ, bhikkhave, sadevakassa … pe … sadevamanussāya idaṁ musāti upanijjhāyitaṁ, tadamariyānaṁ etaṁ saccanti yathābhūtaṁ sammappaññāya sudiṭṭhaṁ, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā.

Evaṁ sammā … pe … athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


762 "Anattani attamāniṁ,
Passa lokaṁ sadevakaṁ;
Niviṭṭhaṁ nāmarūpasmiṁ,
Idaṁ saccanti maññati.

763 Yena yena hi maññanti,
Tato taṁ hoti aññathā;
Tañhi tassa musā hoti,
Mosadhammañhi ittaraṁ.

764 Amosadhammaṁ nibbānaṁ,
Tadariyā saccato vidū;
Te ve saccābhisamayā,
Nicchātā parinibbutāti.


‘Siyā aññenapi pariyāyena sammā dvayatānupassanā’ti, iti ce, bhikkhave, pucchitāro assu; ‘siyā’tissu vacanīyā. Kathañca siyā?

Yaṁ, bhikkhave, sadevakassa lokassa samārakassa sabrahmakassa sassamaṇabrāhmaṇiyā pajāya sadevamanussāya idaṁ sukhanti upanijjhāyitaṁ, tadamariyānaṁ etaṁ dukkhanti yathābhūtaṁ sammappaññāya sudiṭṭhaṁ, ayamekānupassanā. Yaṁ, bhikkhave, sadevakassa … pe … sadevamanussāya idaṁ dukkhanti upanijjhāyitaṁ tadamariyānaṁ etaṁ sukhanti yathābhūtaṁ sammappaññāya sudiṭṭhaṁ, ayaṁ dutiyānupassanā. Evaṁ sammā dvayatānupassino kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhuno appamattassa ātāpino pahitattassa viharato dvinnaṁ phalānaṁ aññataraṁ phalaṁ pāṭikaṅkhaṁ – diṭṭheva dhamme aññā, sati vā upādisese anāgāmitāti.

Idamavoca bhagavā. Idaṁ vatvāna sugato athāparaṁ etadavoca satthā: 


765 "Rūpā saddā rasā gandhā,
Phassā dhammā ca kevalā;
Iṭṭhā kantā manāpā ca,
Yāvatatthīti vuccati.

766 Sadevakassa lokassa,
Ete vo sukhasammatā;
Yattha cete nirujjhanti,
Taṁ nesaṁ dukkhasammataṁ.

767 Sukhanti diṭṭhamariyehi,
Sakkāyassuparodhanaṁ;
Paccanīkamidaṁ hoti,
Sabbalokena passataṁ.

768 Yaṁ pare sukhato āhu,
Tadariyā āhu dukkhato;
Yaṁ pare dukkhato āhu,
Tadariyā sukhato vidū.

769 Passa dhammaṁ durājānaṁ,
Sampamūḷhetthaviddasu;
Nivutānaṁ tamo hoti,
Andhakāro apassataṁ.

770 Satañca vivaṭaṁ hoti,
Āloko passatāmiva;
Santike na vijānanti,
Magā dhammassa kovidā.

771 Bhavarāgaparetehi,
Bhavasotānusāribhi;
Māradheyyānupannehi,
Nāyaṁ dhammo susambudho.

772 Ko nu aññatra mariyehi,
Padaṁ sambuddhumarahati;
Yaṁ padaṁ sammadaññāya,
Parinibbanti anāsavā"ti.


Idamavoca bhagavā. Attamanā te bhikkhū bhagavato bhāsitaṁ abhinandunti. Imasmiñca pana veyyākaraṇasmiṁ bhaññamāne saṭṭhimattānaṁ bhikkhūnaṁ anupādāya āsavehi cittāni vimucciṁsūti.

Dvayatānupassanāsuttaṁ dvādasamaṁ.

Saccaṁ upadhi avijjā ca,
saṅkhāre viññāṇapañcamaṁ;
Phassavedaniyā taṇhā,
upādānārambhaāhārā;
Iñjitaṁ calitaṁ rūpaṁ,
saccaṁ dukkhena soḷasāti.

Mahāvaggo tatiyo.

Pabbajjā ca padhānañca,
subhāsitañca sundari;
Māghasuttaṁ sabhiyo ca,
selo sallañca vuccati.

Vāseṭṭho cāpi kokāli,
Nālako dvayatānupassanā;
Dvādasetāni suttāni,
Mahāvaggoti vuccatīti.